publication summary

Summary

Prohibition, Legalization, and Political Consumerism: Insights from the US and Canadian Cannabis Markets

By Elizabeth Bennett

Cannabis (marijuana) is the most commonly consumed, universally produced, and frequently trafficked psychoactive substance prohibited under international drug control laws. Yet, several countries have recently moved toward legalization. In these places, the legal status of cannabis is complex, especially because illegal markets persist. This chapter explores the ways in which a sector’s legal status interacts with political consumerism. The analysis draws on a case study of political consumerism in the US and Canadian cannabis markets over the past two decades, as both countries moved toward legalization. It finds that the goals, tactics, and leadership of political consumerism activities changed as the sector’s legal status shifted. It suggests that prohibition, semi-legalization, and new legality may present special challenges to political consumerism, such as silencing producers, confusing consumers, deterring social movement organizations, and discouraging discourse about ethical issues. The chapter concludes that political consumerism and legal status may have deep import for one another.

Year
2018  
Title
Prohibition, Legalization, and Political Consumerism: Insights from the US and Canadian Cannabis Markets  
Journal
The Oxford Handbook of Political Consumerism  
Other Info
Edited by Magnus Boström, Michele Micheletti, and Peter Oosterveer. Oxford: Oxford University Press.  
Language
English  
Type
Book section  
Academic Publication
yes  

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